Tag: William Blake

William Blake in Sydney: Blake’s “Job” in the NSW Art Gallery; Brett Whiteley’s “Grain of Sand” in Surry Hills.

What a fabulous connection was made today with creative genius at its source in William Blake’s (1828) original engravings for The Book of Job (1828)  at the Art Gallery of NSW and in Brett Whiteley’s creative masterpiece Alchemy (1971-1972), displayed in the actual Studio occupied by Brett Whiteley during the last years of his life: So it…

And now for the Grand Finale (of this first trawl through Literature Blogs)!

Please find here links to the best third year blogs. These students, most in their third year of literature, are studying “The Visionary Imagination” with a focus on William Blake, Patrick White and David Malouf. Let’s hear a round of applause for the following stars all who got full, or close to full marks!! Emma…

The Marriage of Heaven and Hell: The Bible of Hell

I have also: The Bible of Hell: which the world shall have whether they will or no. For Blake The Marriage of Heaven and Hell occurs when the sanctimonious, commandment-loving Angel finally gives up his/her smug sense of superiority and happily embraces the flames of fire and joins the Devil’s party, a party which believes in the presence…

The Doors of Perception: Heaven and Hell

The song “End of the Night” by The Doors was directly inspired by Blake’s “Auguries of Innocence” especially the lines “Realms of bliss, realms of light, some are borne to sweet delight, some are borne to sweet delight, some are borne to the endless night.” Listen to the Doors singing “End of the Night” here. William Blake takes…

William Blake – Week 2

William Blake was a radical in countless ways: political, religious, personal. He dared to confront and question received knowledge and forced his readers then and now to ask questions about the nature of God, the Universe and everything in it. Among many aspects of his creative life we explored closely today this contrasting vision of…

Wilde, Shaw, Jagger and the Challenge to a Dysfunctional Society

Oscar Wilde’s biographer Richard Ellman tells us that “From as early as 1881 … literary London was put out of countenance by this outrageous Irishman … who declared he was a socialist and hinted he was a homosexual, while patently mocking wise saws on all subjects. He declined, in a public and ceremonious manner, to live…

William Blake and Patrick White

Patrick White was clearly deeply influenced by William Blake. Not only does his novel Riders in the Chariot (arguably his most radical religious novel) begin with a core quote about the power of the prophetic imagination from The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, but White’s obsession with explicitly exploring the transformative power of art, of literature is central…

D.H. Lawrence and Katherine Mansfield

Two extraordinary, brilliant writers who refused to fit into the cage that society wanted for them. There is David Herbert Lawrence with his wild sense of the power and sacredness of sexuality, of the way in which the rhythms of the universe are all in a constant state of creative flux and then there is Katherine…